Currently in the Atlantic - Sept.9, 2022

by Glenn "Hurricane" Schwartz

Below is the latest La Nina evidence over the past week or so. The blue colors represent the La Nina-colder than "normal" ocean temperature from the coast of South America thousands of miles westward to the West Pacific.

La Nina holds firm

This was one of the main factors in the widespread forecasts of yet another very active hurricane season. But that obviously hasn't happened-at least until now.

The thing that separates this La Nina with many ones in the past is that this is the THIRD STRAIGHT year with La Nina conditions. The only other time this has happened in the past 30 years was 1998-2000. La Nina is represented below by the blue numbers. You can clearly see the similarity. So, the only year of a "triple-dip" La Nina was 2000. (We can't go back very far in history for analogies since the climate has changed so much-even 2000 may be a stretch).

1998

2.2

1.9

1.4

1.0

0.5

-0.1

-0.8

-1.1

-1.3

-1.4

-1.5

-1.6

1999

-1.5

-1.3

-1.1

-1.0

-1.0

-1.0

-1.1

-1.1

-1.2

-1.3

-1.5

-1.7

Year

DJF

JFM

FMA

MAM

AMJ

MJJ

JJA

JAS

ASO

SON

OND

NDJ

2000

-1.7

-1.4

-1.1

-0.8

-0.7

-0.6

-0.6

-0.5

-0.5

-0.6

-0.7

-0.7

Year

DJF

JFM

FMA

MAM

AMJ

MJJ

JJA

JAS

ASO

SON

OND

NDJ

2020

0.5

0.5

0.4

0.2

-0.1

-0.3

-0.4

-0.6

-0.9

-1.2

-1.3

-1.2

2021

-1.0

-0.9

-0.8

-0.7

-0.5

-0.4

-0.4

-0.5

-0.7

-0.8

-1.0

-1.0

2022

-1.0

-0.9

-1.0

-1.1

-1.0

-0.9

-0.8

The 2000 hurricane season map looks pretty similar to what we've seen so far this year. A late start to the season, with the first storm not until August. A full half of the season occurred in the second half of September and a rather active October. But the bulk of it consisted of storms that died before reaching the Caribbean or U.S., or ones that recurved into the North Atlantic.

Extra warmth in North Atlantic!

The map above shows the continued "extra warm" water across the entire North Atlantic. This has obviously affected the development of Danielle and the strengthening of Earl. But the rest of the tropical Atlantic is plenty warm (as usual in September). There's more of hurricane season left.

Glenn "Hurricane" Schwartz   thehurricaneschwartz@gmail.com

What you need to know, currently.

Queen Elizabeth II died today and our founder, Eric Holthaus, wrote a piece on the ways climate reparations might be the best way to deal with her legacy.

"Queen Elizabeth II, the longest-reigning monarch in British history, died on Thursday.

Elizabeth’s legacy will be many things, but perhaps the most consequential trend she presided over is the steady escalation of climate emergency — and the cumulative harm of climate colonialism that the monarchy bears responsibility for.

In 2020, a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found that the impact of climate change had been magnified in formerly colonized countries in the Caribbean and southwest Indian Oceans. The researchers found that colonization degraded soils, removed forests, and erased eons of traditional knowledge that previously enabled people to coexist with extreme weather. In some cases, the researchers concluded, colonialism was directly responsible for 'irreversible ecological shifts.'

It’s impossible to fathom, much less calculate, the consequences of British Imperialism on the planet as a whole."

Click here to read the whole article!

What you can do, currently.

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